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July 10 2019

13:34

A Curated Library of Essential Dataviz Books

A filterable chart of dataviz books that we think everyone should read.

We excluded books about specific tools or programming concepts, but you’ll find them in the full datasheet.

Crowdsourced with the help of the Data Visualization Society

Did we miss any? Send a suggestion.

» Check out our recommendations

04:26
Game Of Thrones en tapisserie sur 80 mètres, en vidéo

July 09 2019

04:32
De saisissants reliefs en trompe l’oeil sur des bâtiments

July 07 2019

05:46
Cracked

July 06 2019

09:00
la nature et l’abandon, infiniment détaillés par Olivia Kemp

July 04 2019

06:12
Stunning Print Series by Massimo Colonna

July 02 2019

22:53

YANSS 157 – The psychology behind why people don’t speak out against, and even defend, norms they secretly despise

Have you ever been in a classroom or a business meeting or a conference  and had a question or been confused by the presentation, and when the person running the show asked, “Does anyone have any questions?” or, “Does anyone not understand?” or, “Is anyone confused?” you looked around, saw no one else raising their hands, and then chose to pass on the opportunity to clear up your confusion?

If so, then, first of all, you are a normal, fully functioning human being with a normal, fully functioning brain, because not only is this common and predictable, there’s a psychological term for why most people don’t speak up in situations like these. It’s called pluralistic ignorance.

In a “Does anyone have any questions?” scenario like this, each confused individual waits to see if anyone else raises their hands, not wanting to be singled out as the only person falling behind. When no one does, each then assumes they must be the only person who has no idea what is going on and decides to remain silent. After a few seconds, the speaker moves on, and the result is a shared, inaccurate view of reality in which everyone thinks that everyone else has no questions. The speaker thinks the room is following along just fine, and everyone begins living a lie.

There are several ways to define pluralistic ignorance, and that’s because it’s kind of a brain twister when you try to put it into words. Psychologist Deborah Prentice says, it’s “a phenomenon in which you feel like you’re different from everyone else, but in fact you are exactly the same. It’s a kind of illusory deviance, a sense that you are not with the majority that everyone in the majority can have simultaneously.”

And this phenomenon scales up to the level of norms. When people are unhappy with a norm, but aren’t sure if they are alone in that thinking, when they don’t know what the majority opinion truly is, they play it safe and adhere to the norms of the day, but since we can’t read each other’s minds, we assume that others are following norms because they actually believe in them. Everyone in the group, at the same time, gets stuck following a norm that no one wants to follow.

The false belief that the majority supports an unpopular norm slows down the process of ending it and sways policy makers, employers, advertisers, and the rest of society to act as though they live in a world that isn’t really there. And When change is on the horizon, pluralistic ignorance keeps people on the fringe, the sort of people whose beliefs and attitudes will be phased out by that change, clinging to their outdated worldviews for longer than they would otherwise. It also keeps their opponents feeling less supported than they truly are while pushing people in the middle to favor the status quo. In the end, a make-believe status quo changes the way everyone acts and thinks. As sociologists Hubert J. O’Gorman and Stephen L. Garry once put it, in situations like these, people often “unintentionally serve as cultural carriers of cognitive error.”

Pluralistic ignorance has been blamed for everything from excessive drinking on college campuses to the persistence of racial segregation well into the 1970s. So, how do you deal with such a strange and mind-twisting phenomenon? Well, for some norms, the solution is simple, though it can take a lot of organization and effort. You must ask everyone what they really think and feel, and then you broadcast that to everyone in some way. You must make the private public. You must make it safe to say what is really on your mind — or you simply reveal that it was safe to do so all along.

Many scientists bring up the parable of “The Emperor’s New Clothes.” In the story by Hans Christian Andersen, a vain emperor hires two tailors who tell him they’ve made a suit of clothes so fine that it appears invisible to people who are unfit for their job or are very dumb. The trick, of course, is that the tailors haven’t made anything at all. All the emperor’s lackeys and subjects act as if his clothes were beautiful and amazing out of fear of appearing stupid or unfit, until finally a child points out that the emperor is walking around naked. At that point, everyone sighs in relief and feels safe to say what they were thinking all along. Stories with similar plots go back to antiquity, so the idea has been with us for a long time. The takeaway is usually: if someone has the courage to speak up, then the spell will be broken.

But there is an exception. A dark, terrible exception. When almost everyone in a group privately disagrees with a norm, or a decision, or an idea, or a practice, or a plan…but everyone also thinks they are alone in that disagreement, they may go along with what they think is the consensus, which leads a group of people to prepare to act in a way that no one actually wants to act. When one person speaks up, instead of breaking the spell, the crowd will sometimes shout that person down.

That’s what happened in 1978 at Jonestown, when Jim Jones asked 700 people to kill 300 of their children and then themselves. One person, Christine Miller, stood up and plead for everyone to choose another option. She defied her leader, and her community. Instead of joining her in revolt, the people around her engaged in what psychologists call false enforcement. By shouting at her, they signaled they were willing to die to show their loyalty to the group, even though in so doing they destroyed the very group to which they were signaling their allegiance.

False enforcement is one of our most twisted predilections, a sort of algorithmic mental malfunction that can cause pluralistic ignorance to turn deadly, and in this episode, you will learn how prevalent it is out here among our everyday lives, and what we can do about it.

Download – iTunes – Stitcher – RSS – PatreonSoundcloud

This  episode is sponsored by The Great Courses Plus. Get unlimited access to a huge library of The Great Courses lecture series on many fascinating subjects. Start FOR FREE with The Psychology of Human Behavior taught by David W. Martin. Learn about how your mind makes sense of the world and what motivates us to think, feel, and behave differently from one another. Click here for a FREE TRIAL.

Patreon

Support the show directly by becoming a patron! Get episodes one-day-early and ad-free. Head over to the YANSS Patreon Page for more details.

Deborah Prentice is a professor of psychology and provost at Princeton University. Her work focuses on “how people are guided by norms and constrained by norms; how they respond when they feel out of step,” and how they determine what the norms of their groups and communities are; and how they react… to those who violate social norms.”

Robb Willer is a professor of sociology, psychology, and organizational behavior and the director of the Polarization and Social Change Laboratory at Stanford University. He studies the social forces that bring people together, divide them, and shape their political attitudes.

Links and Sources

Download – iTunes – Stitcher – RSS – Patreon –  Soundcloud

Deborah Prentice’s Website

Robb Willer’s Website

Robb Willer’s Twitter

Pluralistic Ignorance and Alcohol Use on Campus: Some Consequences of Misperceiving the Social Norm

The False Enforcement of Unpopular Norms

SDSU’s Jonestown Website

Christine Miller: A Voice of Independence

IMAGE CREDIT: Emperor’s New Clothes: Vilhelm Pedersen (1820 – 1859)

IMAGE CREDIT: Christine Miller: San Diego State University

IMAGE CREDIT: Jonestown: NBC News Archives

MUSIC CREDIT: Mogwai, Drew Garraway, Snabish

July 01 2019

23:43

YANSS 156 – The science behind how we became so obsessed with our selves

In this episode of the You Are Not So Smart Podcast we sit down with my friend and one of my favorite journalists, author Will Storr, whose new book just hit the shelves here in the United States. It’s called Selfie: How We Became so Self-Obsessed, and What it is Doing to Us.

The book explores what he calls “the age of perfectionism” — our modern struggle with our many modern pressures to meet newly emerging ideals and standards that tell us if we are falling short of the person we ought to be – and how that struggle to be that person is an impossible task. As he says in the book, “perfectionism is the idea that kills,” and you’ll hear him explain what he means by that in the interview.

In the book, Will embarks on two investigative journeys. The first is an examination of the self as a psychological mechanism. He digs deep into what science has to say about where our concept of self originated and how it operates so that he can understand how perfectionism causes that mechanism to malfunction.

The second is how the cultural concept of self originated and then evolved over millennia. The very concept of a self has changed many times, as have the pressures that concept has endured, and depending on where you live today, the lineage of your culture’s idea of the ideal self will strongly differ from people who live elsewhere, surrounded by different cultural norms and expectations that change what it means to be fully realized and unique individual.

As he writes, “it is the self that wants to become perfect, and it’s our culture that tells us what perfect actually is.” It’s a great book, and I hope you check it out.

For this episode, Will and I just had a conversation about it, and there’s some great prescriptive advice near the end involving a lizard on an iceberg.

Download – iTunes – Stitcher – RSS – Soundcloud

Great Courses Plus This  episode is sponsored by The Great Courses Plus. Get unlimited access to a huge library of The Great Courses lecture series on many fascinating subjects. Start FOR FREE with Your Deceptive Mind taught by neurologist Steven Novella. Learn about how your mind makes sense of the world by lying to itself and others. Click here for a FREE TRIAL.

Links and Sources

Download – iTunes – Stitcher – RSS – Soundcloud

Previous Episodes

Boing Boing Podcasts

Cookie Recipes

Will Storr’s Website

June 30 2019

06:33
The Art of Handcrafted Flowers

June 29 2019

08:09
La naissance d’un livre en moins de deux minutes

June 28 2019

13:53
Un creux ou une bosse ?
10:10
Dezoom, s’envoler pour voir le monde autrement

June 24 2019

19:37

June 20 2019

22:12
Imrich Kovács’ Dadaistic Attitude is Expressed in His Tattoo Art
21:40

Fact-Checking The Vegan Netflix Documentary ‘What The Health’

I’ve been vegetarian for 26 years. Never managed to make the leap to vegan though. Cheese and eggs. Cheese and eggs. I’m working on it.

Here’s my motivational breakdown:

It’s been interesting to witness the abrupt mainstreaming of vegan and plant-based diets in recent years. But less interesting to have so many friends suddenly start lecturing me how cruel the meat industry is, how unhealthy red meat is, how environmentally damaging. Thank! You!

More striking is the amount of people who’ve said:

“Have you seen it? What the Health? The vegan documentary on Netflix. OMG. You gotta see it.”

So I did. I watched the What The Health documentary on Netflix, directed by Kip Andersen (sorry, SEO).

It is powerful, moving and shocking without being gory or alienating. But my journalistic spidey-sense started pulsing as I watched it. It’s kinda too powerful. Too certain of itself. Too sure. Some of the facts raised the BS-detecting hairs on the back of my neck.

So I gathered the team and we dove in to produce an interactive scene-by-scene, fact-by-fact visual analysis of the documentary. Have a play to see how true the film is.

SPOILER: it’s a mix. Classic misinformation-age / post-truth fare. There’s chunks of truth, some misleading facts, a few outright falsehoods, some very old science, some recent science. All intermixed. Blended into a modern smoothie. Tastes good, feels healthy, but who knows what’s hidden in the ingredients list?

Well, we do now.

It’s saddening because the scientific evidence is in, and vegans are right. Plant-based diets are a choice for good – health, emissions, animal welfare, land use, kindness. Every way you look at it, vegans, you are ethically correct. So please – there’s no need to lie.

» See the interactive
» Read the data


CREDITS
Research & writing: David McCandless, Stephanie Tomasevic, Duncan Geere, Miriam Quick
Code: Omid Kashan
21:40

Fact-Checking The Vegan Netflix Documentary ‘What The Health’

I’ve been vegetarian for 26 years. Never managed to make the leap to vegan though. Cheese and eggs. Cheese and eggs. I’m working on it.

Here’s my motivational breakdown:

It’s been interesting to witness the abrupt mainstreaming of vegan and plant-based diets in recent years. But less interesting to have so many friends suddenly start lecturing me how cruel the meat industry is, how unhealthy red meat is, how environmentally damaging. Thank! You!

More striking is the amount of people who’ve said:

“Have you seen it? What the Health? The vegan documentary on Netflix. OMG. You gotta see it.”

So I did. I watched the What The Health documentary on Netflix, directed by Kip Andersen (sorry, SEO).

It is powerful, moving and shocking without being gory or alienating. But my journalistic spidey-sense started pulsing as I watched it. It’s kinda too powerful. Too certain of itself. Too sure. Some of the facts raised the BS-detecting hairs on the back of my neck.

So I gathered the team and we dove in to produce an interactive scene-by-scene, fact-by-fact visual analysis of the documentary. Have a play to see how true the film is.

SPOILER: it’s a mix. Classic misinformation-age / post-truth fare. There’s chunks of truth, some misleading facts, a few outright falsehoods, some very old science, some recent science. All intermixed. Blended into a modern smoothie. Tastes good, feels healthy, but who knows what’s hidden in the ingredients list?

Well, we do now.

It’s saddening because the scientific evidence is in, and vegans are right. Plant-based diets are a choice for good – health, emissions, animal welfare, land use, kindness. Every way you look at it, vegans, you are ethically correct. So please – there’s no need to lie.

» See the interactive
» Read the data


CREDITS
Research & writing: David McCandless, Stephanie Tomasevic, Duncan Geere, Miriam Quick
Code: Omid Kashan
08:25

The Hat Pendant Lamp




Chic Lighting! By Eno Studio.

[via]

June 19 2019

11:54

Information is Beautiful Awards 2019

Rejoice! The Information is Beautiful Awards are now open for 2019.

It’s our eighth year celebrating the planet’s most awesome information design and we have $27,500 in cash prizes to give away, courtesy of our wonderful sponsor Kantar. Twenty-five expert judges, plus a public vote, will decide who takes home our coveted, 3D-printed trophy.

We have gold, silver and bronze awards in ten different categories plus six special prizes awarded by the judging panel.

IIB Awards Infographic

As usual, students and public whose work has not been professionally commissioned / published enter free. Studios / agencies, NGOs and media pay to submit work. Previous winners have gone on to land new clients, book deals, investment and jobs with hot startups.

Any piece created between 1st June 2018 and 30 August 2019 is eligible, as long as you have not entered it in any previous Information is Beautiful Awards.

» Enter the 2019 Awards

» Browse all shortlists, longlists and winners dating back to 2012.
» Check out the 2018 Awards ceremony in New York.
» Discover what we look for in a great dataviz.

Key Dates

Entries close 30 August 2019, 11:59pm PST
Longlist released 17 September 2019
Shortlist released and public voting begins 1 October 2019
Winners announced at our ceremony in London at the end of November 2019

11:54

Information is Beautiful Awards 2019

Rejoice! The Information is Beautiful Awards are now open for 2019.

It’s our eighth year celebrating the planet’s most awesome information design and we have $27,500 in cash prizes to give away, courtesy of our wonderful sponsor Kantar. Twenty-five expert judges, plus a public vote, will decide who takes home our coveted, 3D-printed trophy.

We have gold, silver and bronze awards in ten different categories plus six special prizes awarded by the judging panel.

IIB Awards Infographic

As usual, students and public whose work has not been professionally commissioned / published enter free. Studios / agencies, NGOs and media pay to submit work. Previous winners have gone on to land new clients, book deals, investment and jobs with hot startups.

Any piece created between 1st June 2018 and 30 August 2019 is eligible, as long as you have not entered it in any previous Information is Beautiful Awards.

» Enter the 2019 Awards

» Browse all shortlists, longlists and winners dating back to 2012.
» Check out the 2018 Awards ceremony in New York.
» Discover what we look for in a great dataviz.

Key Dates

Entries close 30 August 2019, 11:59pm PST
Longlist released 17 September 2019
Shortlist released and public voting begins 1 October 2019
Winners announced at our ceremony in London at the end of November 2019

June 17 2019

20:02
The 2020 A’ Design Awards is Accepting Early-Bird Submissions
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