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February 27 2014

09:05

February 26 2014

08:04

February 25 2014

19:00
08:18
08:00

February 24 2014

08:04

February 21 2014

08:02

February 20 2014

08:05

February 14 2014

08:03

Viva Fútbol

Philippe Parreno
Douglas Gordon
Zidane: A 21st Century Portrait, 2006
© Philippe Parreno and Douglas Gordon

Football, or soccer as they like to call it, is on the up in America. Many European stars are heading there for a last hurrah, such as David Beckham, who has just announced plans to start a Major League Soccer franchise (or team, as we like to call them) in Miami. But it’s his old stomping ground of Los Angeles that can lay claim to being the stronghold of North American soccer. It’s the only U.S. city to boast two MLS teams – Becks’ old club Galaxy and CD Chivas, a subsidiary of Mexican side Guadalajara – and it’s the venue for the exhibition Fútbol: The Beautiful Game being held at The Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA).

The game can be divided into two spheres of interest – what happens on the pitch, and what happens off it – and the show is anchored around two such distinct video installations. Zidane: A 21st Century Portrait is a peerless study of the equally incomparable Frenchman by Philippe Parreno and Douglas Gordon, who track the balletic player exclusively for a whole match and is set to a majestic Mogwai soundtrack. Stephen Dean’s Volta, in contrast, turns the camera on the fans, with a samba soundtrack accompanying the ritualized frenzy in the stands of various stadia. Nearly 30 artists have contributed around 50 works in a variety of media to the exhibition, which is available to enjoy until 20 July.

@LACMA

Fútbol: The Beautiful Game at LACMA — Los Angeles

Installation view
Fútbol: The Beautiful Game
February 2 – July 20, 2014
Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Photo © 2014 Museum Associates/LACMA

Fútbol: The Beautiful Game at LACMA — Los Angeles

Andy Warhol
Pele, 1978
Silkscreen
40 x 40 in
University of Maryland Art Gallery,
College Park, MD
© Andy Warhol Foundation/
Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Fútbol: The Beautiful Game at LACMA — Los Angeles

Lyle Ashton Harris
Verona #2, 2001-2004
Silver gelatin print
16 x 20 in
The Robert E. Holmes Collection
© Lyle Ashton Harris

Fútbol: The Beautiful Game at LACMA — Los Angeles

Kehinde Wiley
Samuel Eto’o, 2010
Oil on canvas
72 x 60 in
Roberts & Tilton Gallery
© Kehinde Wiley
Image courtesy of the artist,
and Roberst & Tilton,
Culver City, California

Fútbol: The Beautiful Game at LACMA — Los Angeles

Installation view
Fútbol: The Beautiful Game
February 2 – July 20, 2014
Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Photo © 2014 Museum Associates/LACMA

Fútbol: The Beautiful Game at LACMA — Los Angeles

Generic Art Solutions
Pieta, 2008
Photograph
36 x 36 in
Courtesy of Jonathan Ferrara Gallery,
New Orleans
© Generic Art Solutions

Fútbol: The Beautiful Game at LACMA — Los Angeles

Installation view
Fútbol: The Beautiful Game
February 2 – July 20, 2014
Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Photo © 2014 Museum Associates/LACMA

Fútbol: The Beautiful Game at LACMA — Los Angeles

Installation view
Fútbol: The Beautiful Game
February 2 – July 20, 2014
Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Photo © 2014 Museum Associates/LACMA

Fútbol: The Beautiful Game at LACMA — Los Angeles

Installation view
Fútbol: The Beautiful Game
February 2 – July 20, 2014
Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Photo © 2014 Museum Associates/LACMA

Fútbol: The Beautiful Game at LACMA — Los Angeles

Installation view
Fútbol: The Beautiful Game
February 2 – July 20, 2014
Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Photo © 2014 Museum Associates/LACMA

Fútbol: The Beautiful Game at LACMA — Los Angeles

Miguel Calderón
Mexico vs Brasil, 2004
Video transferred to DVD
90:00 min
Duration: 1hrs 30 minutes
Courtesy of the artist and kurimanzutto, Mexico City
© Miguel Calderón

The post Viva Fútbol appeared first on We Heart; Lifestyle & Design Magazine.

08:00

Up Grade

Sort your life out! If you hear that a lot, it could be time to seek out help. But where to start? The School of Life could be a good bet. At this school, algebra is out, and the curriculum is focused on emotional intelligence achieved through culture, whether it be art, philosophy, psychology or literature. Learn how to be happy and fulfilled, how to navigate the tricky waters of relationships, how to deal with the past, and look to the future. Based in London, the group runs workshops and therapy groups around the world, publishes books, and has a spangly new range of natty objects available from the Southbank Centre that can help you on your way.

We all need to take a timeout now and then, but shouldn’t we make it a more regular and constructive activity? Check out the 15 Minutes hourglass, which will ensure you give enough consideration to the things that really matter. Or the Emotional Baggage Tote; most people have baggage, so why not carry it in style? The Japanese style Virtue Dolls are an ideal gift. A reminder of what’s important, there’s one each for Calm, Bravery and Kindness. And finally, The Toolkit for Relationships offers practical ways to jumpstart communication and get you both back on the same page. No more excuses, sort yourselves out!

@TheSchoolOfLife

New School of Life Products
New School of Life Products
New School of Life Products
New School of Life Products
New School of Life Products
New School of Life Products
New School of Life Products

The post Up Grade appeared first on We Heart; Lifestyle & Design Magazine.

February 04 2014

08:05

Shot in the Dark

Untitled (Prostitute Series, 1975-1977)
© Kaveh Golestan,
courtesy Kaveh Golestan Estate

The year is 1975, and the place is the Iranian capital Tehran. Within the walls of the Shahr-e No citadel was a place only women lived, and where only men were allowed to visit – the city’s red light district. Our tour guide is Irani documentary photographer Kaveh Golestan who spent two years in the area compiling his series, Prostitute, which is being exhibited for the first time in this complete set since 1978 in Kaveh Golestan — The Citadel. The series remains an important record of the Shahr-e No, or New City, as it was eradicated by the Ayatollah following the revolution in 1979, falling foul of the new regime’s strict Islamic rule.

Golestan is considered an important figure in photography if somewhat overlooked in Western circles; in particular his work covering the Iran-Iraq war in the 1980s was judged particularly noteworthy. The Prostitute photographs appeared in an Iranian national newspaper of the day along with three essays, highlighting the poor working conditions of the women, but the story did not have a happy ending for either the artist or the women he photographed. The area was set on fire before it was demolished, and some of those who survived the blaze were rounded up and shot in the summer of 1980. Golestan himself was killed by a landmine while working for the BBC in Iraq in 2003, aged 52. Kaveh Golestan — The Citadel is being exhibited at Foam in Amsterdam from 21 March to 4 May.

@foam_amsterdam

Kaveh Golestan — The Citadel

Untitled (Prostitute Series, 1975-1977)
© Kaveh Golestan,
courtesy Kaveh Golestan Estate

Kaveh Golestan — The Citadel

Untitled (Prostitute Series, 1975-1977)
© Kaveh Golestan,
courtesy Kaveh Golestan Estate

Kaveh Golestan — The Citadel

Untitled (Prostitute Series, 1975-1977)
© Kaveh Golestan,
courtesy Kaveh Golestan Estate

Kaveh Golestan — The Citadel

Untitled (Prostitute Series, 1975-1977)
© Kaveh Golestan,
courtesy Kaveh Golestan Estate

The post Shot in the Dark appeared first on We Heart; Lifestyle & Design Magazine.

January 30 2014

08:20

No Holds Barred

Dorothy Iannone,
My Caravan, 1990,
Gouache auf Leinwand auf Holz, 65 x 84 cm,
Privatsammlung Anette und Jürgen Ruttmann,
© Dorothy Iannone,
Foto: Ilona Ripke

Dorothy Iannone is an artist with balls, and This Sweetness Outside of Time, a retrospective of her long and illustrious career, displays her unflinching autobiographical style in all its glory. Beginning her career in the late 1950s, the American’s style really blossomed on meeting Dieter Roth in the late ’60s. This intense seven-year relationship moved the artist to place herself and Roth at the centre of her passionate works. Regularly falling foul of the censors, her sexually explicit scenes draw on influences from religious art from Christianity, Buddhism and Indian Tantrism, as well as collage and pop art.

Iannone’s time with Roth marked a long association with Germany; the pair lived in Dusseldorf, and in 1976 Iannone was awarded a DAAD Artists-in-Berlin grant and moved to the capital, where she has lived and worked ever since. The Berlinische Galerie has curated this retrospective – which includes objects, books and films in addition to the paintings – from the artist’s personal archive and those of worldwide collectors; the exhibition will run from 20 February to 2 June.

Dorothy Iannone — This Sweetness Outside of Time

Dorothy Iannone,
The Next Great Moment In History Is Ours, 1970,
Farbsiebdruck auf Papier, 73 x 102 cm,
Courtesy die Künstlerin,
Air de Paris, Paris,
und Peres Projects, Berlin,
Foto: Joachim Littkemann

Dorothy Iannone — This Sweetness Outside of Time

Dorothy Iannone,
Let the Light from My Lighthouse Shine on You, 1981,
Acryl und Gouache auf Kunststoffplatte
montiert auf Pavatex, 142,5 x 102,5 cm,
Privatsammlung Schweiz,
© Dorothy Iannone,
Foto: Jochen Littkemann,
Courtesy Air de Paris, Paris

Dorothy Iannone — This Sweetness Outside of Time

Dorothy Iannone,
aus: Dialogues X, 1968/69,
Filzstift und Collage auf Papier,
Neun Zeichnungen, je 36,5 x 36 cm,
Sammlung Aldo Frei,
© Dorothy Iannone,
Foto: Jochen Littkemann

Dorothy Iannone — This Sweetness Outside of Time

Dorothy Iannone,
Brokeback Mountain, ausder Serie Movie People, 2010,
Gouache und Acrylauf Papier auf Holz, 53 x 54 x 18 cm
Courtesy die Künstlerin,
Air de Paris, Paris,
und Peres Projects, Berlin,
Foto: Hans-Georg Gaul

Dorothy Iannone — This Sweetness Outside of Time

Dorothy Iannone
The Statue Of Liberty, 1977,
Farbsieb druck auf Papier, 83,5 x 60 cm,
Herausgegeben von Studio Galerie MikeSteiner,
Berlin -76/100 ,Courtesydie Künstlerin,
Air de Paris, Paris,
und Peres Projects, Berlin,
Foto: All rights reserved

Dorothy Iannone — This Sweetness Outside of Time

Dorothy Iannone,
I Dreamt There Was An Emperor Antony, 1970,
Collage und Acryl auf Leinwand, 200 x 130 cm,
ahlers collection,
© Dorothy Iannone

Dorothy Iannone — This Sweetness Outside of Time

Dorothy Iannone,
The Sheltering Sky, aus der Serie Movie People, 2010,
Gouache und Acryl auf Papier auf Holz, 53 x 55 x 16 cm,
Privatsammlung, USA,
© Dorothy Iannone,
Foto: Hans-Georg Gaul

The post No Holds Barred appeared first on We Heart; Lifestyle & Design Magazine.

January 29 2014

08:00

Wild Side Revisited

Transformer: Aspects of Travesty,
Installation
Photo, Peter White

When Lou Reed wrote about Holly’s journey from Miami to New York, and from man to woman, in his song Walk on the Wild Side, he created one of the most important verses in music. In those few short lines from 1972 he brought transsexuality into the mainstream consciousness – the track received a surprising amount of airplay for the time, especially given its other references to drugs and prostitution.

A couple of years later, in Switzerland, an exhibition named after Reed’s album Transformer was to prove an equally seminal moment in the visual arts’ relationship with gender issues. Transformer: Aspects of Travesty at the Kunstmuseum, Lucerne, went unreported in Britain, but the event was filmed for Swiss television and later toured Germany and Austria. To mark the exhibition’s 40th anniversary, the London gallery Richard Saltoun is revisiting Transformer, gathering together all the original artists’ work and adding a programme of film screenings and talks surrounding the themes of this ground-breaking show. The closing date is 28 February.

@RSaltounGallery

Transformer: Aspects of Travesty

Transformer: Aspects of Travesty,
Installation
Photo, Peter White

Transformer: Aspects of Travesty

Jürgen Klauke

Transformer, 1973

Vintage colour photograph.
180 x 105 cm
© The Artist.
Courtesy Richard Saltoun Gallery

Transformer: Aspects of Travesty

Transformer: Aspects of Travesty,
Installation
Photo, Peter White

Transformer: Aspects of Travesty

Luciano Castelli
His Majesty The Queen, 1973
Photo made with self-timer.
84 x 63 cm
© The Artist.
Courtesy Richard Saltoun Gallery

Transformer: Aspects of Travesty

Transformer: Aspects of Travesty,
Installation
Photo, Peter White

Transformer: Aspects of Travesty

Transformer: Aspects of Travesty,
Installation
Photo, Peter White

Transformer: Aspects of Travesty

Katharina Sieverding

Transformer 2A, 1974

C-Print, Acrylic, Steel.
190 x 125 cm
© The Artist, VG Bild-Kunst.
Photo: Klaus Mettig, VG Bild-Kunst.
Courtesy Richard Saltoun Gallery.

Transformer: Aspects of Travesty

Walter Pfeiffer

Untitled (Carlo Joh Series), 1973

Black and white gelatin-silver print.
11 x 15.5 cm
© The Artist.
Courtesy Collection Fotomuseum Winterthur, Switzerland.

The post Wild Side Revisited appeared first on We Heart; Lifestyle & Design Magazine.

January 16 2014

08:35

To Me…To You…

Have you had your three Shredded Wheat this morning? This lot certainly have. In fact they finished them all, then ate the box, the bowl, the spoon and maybe even the waiter who served them as well by the looks of things. These hefty units are Polish champion powerlifters, assembled into a formidable team by German artist Christian Jankowski for his Heavy Weight History art project.

They are pictured in the capital Warsaw, busting a gut to lift some of the city’s most important statuary. Communist-era monuments, post-Soviet celebratory statues, and earlier symbols of historical Poland are all tackled by the team in a metaphorical attempt to lift the burden of the past from the shoulders of the country, while at the same time reminding locals of the statuary, stimulating debate on their relevance and inviting ideas on future additions. The collection of photographs is being exhibited at Lisson Gallery, London, in conjunction with an installation and a 25-minute film. The end date is 8 March.

@Lisson_Gallery

Christian Jankowski — Heavy Weight History
Christian Jankowski — Heavy Weight History
Christian Jankowski — Heavy Weight History
Christian Jankowski — Heavy Weight History
Christian Jankowski — Heavy Weight History
Christian Jankowski — Heavy Weight History
Christian Jankowski — Heavy Weight History

Heavy Weight History, 2013
Video, 25 min. colour, sound
© Christian Jankowski;
courtesy Lisson Gallery, London

The post To Me…To You… appeared first on We Heart; Lifestyle & Design Magazine.

08:25

Landscapes of Our Fathers

Tom Wood
Achill Red (between Dugourt and Keel), 1990

Tom Wood is renowned for his talent as a photographer of people, especially working-class Liverpudlians, so it’s a rare treat to enjoy an exhibition of his lesser-known landscape works, selected from his archive and spanning over 40 years of his career, at Llandudno’s MOSTYN gallery.

Wood was born in the West of Ireland, and scenes from his childhood home are joined by images taken on Merseyside during the 25 years he lived there, and in North Wales, where he now calls home having moved to the Vale of Clwyd in 2003. He returns yearly to Ireland, drawn back by the area’s natural beauty and perhaps the pull of nostalgia, and photographs made there over decades show a great love for the area, as well as a great sense of humour (assuming you find pissing horses funny, but who doesn’t?). Many of his photographs are taken from a moving car, and transport of all kinds features often. Less ad hoc compositions have become more prevalent as technology has allowed Wood, utilising panoramic cameras, to create broad, sweeping landscapes of North Wales.

As well as showing his own photographs and video, he will be inviting visitors to become part of the Biscuit Tin Photo Archive – digging out the old photos from wherever they are gathering dust and shedding new light on rural life in Wales. Tom Wood – Landscapes will run from 18 January to 6 April.

@MOSTYN_Wales_

Tom Wood — Landscapes at MOSTYN, Llandudno

Tom Wood
Mersey Family Vauxhall, 2002

Tom Wood — Landscapes at MOSTYN, Llandudno

Tom Wood
Back from Pontoon, (Cavecalf), 1975

Tom Wood — Landscapes at MOSTYN, Llandudno

Tom Wood
Father and Sunset, 2000

Tom Wood — Landscapes at MOSTYN, Llandudno

Tom Wood
Three Generations Frozen Lamb, 2011

Tom Wood — Landscapes at MOSTYN, Llandudno

Tom Wood
Loggerheads View, 2010

Tom Wood — Landscapes at MOSTYN, Llandudno

Biscuit Tin Photo Archive

Tom Wood — Landscapes at MOSTYN, Llandudno

Tom Wood
Walk to the Green Rooms, Kilshanig, 1987

Tom Wood — Landscapes at MOSTYN, Llandudno

Tom Wood
May Day Bush, 2005

Tom Wood — Landscapes at MOSTYN, Llandudno

Biscuit Tin Photo Archive

Tom Wood — Landscapes at MOSTYN, Llandudno

Tom Wood
Above Horseshoe Pass, 2008

Tom Wood — Landscapes at MOSTYN, Llandudno

Tom Wood
Bill’s Sweet William

All images courtesy the artist.

The post Landscapes of Our Fathers appeared first on We Heart; Lifestyle & Design Magazine.

January 15 2014

08:52

Night Moves

Tom Wood,
Lumberjack Kiss, 1986,
from Looking for Love, series, 1983-86.
C-type, 58 x 75 cms (frame size).
Courtesy the artist.

It’s three in the morning, and anything is possible. While some people are tucked up in bed dreaming the night away, nightowls are still out in bars and clubs living it up. Maybe the night sky is studded with stars, or obscured the orange glow of urban streetlights. Perhaps dreams seem more like nightmares, full of ghosts and monsters that turn a peaceful night into a time of terror, when every creak signals approaching danger. Maybe there is no sleep at all, and the night is spent staring at the ceiling, fretting over the day to come or the day just survived.

Group exhibition 3am: Wonder, Paranoia and the Restless Night features 22 UK and international artists and their visions of the mysterious night time hour. For participants such as Sandra Cinto, 3am means limitless space. Her large-scale fabric installations convey infinity and the silent vacuum in their representations of the galaxy. In a more temporal interpretation, Michael Palm and Willi Dorner take to the streets for the film Body Trail, following a couple of youths through the city and intermittently encountering them piled in living sculptures. Another urban explorer is Danny Treacy, who cuts an unsettling figure in his wardrobe of reassembled grubby clothes found on the streets. Curated by the Bluecoat‘s Angela Kingston and exhibited by Chapter gallery, Cardiff, 3am: Wonder, Paranoia and the Restless Night will be shown until 2 March, and there is a companion publication available from Liverpool University Press.

@chaptergallery
@theBluecoat

3AM: Wonder, Paranoia and the Restless Night — Chapter Gallery, Cardiff

Hirsch Perlman,
My Reproof #11, 2003-2004.
Gelatine silver print,
40.6 x 50.8 cms.
Courtesy the artist.

3AM: Wonder, Paranoia and the Restless Night — Chapter Gallery, Cardiff

Danny Treacy,
Them #25, 2010.
Lambda digital C print
mounted on aluminium,
215 x 180 cms.

3AM: Wonder, Paranoia and the Restless Night — Chapter Gallery, Cardiff

Michael Palm and Willi Dorner,
Body Trail, 2008.
Film still from original film.
Courtesy Sixpackfilm

3AM: Wonder, Paranoia and the Restless Night — Chapter Gallery, Cardiff

Ed Pien,
Becoming Giant, 2012.
Ink on sectioned paper,
76.2 x 114.3 cms.
Courtesy the artist,
Pierre-François Ouellette
Art Contemporain, Montreal,
Birch Libralato, Toronto.

3AM: Wonder, Paranoia and the Restless Night — Chapter Gallery, Cardiff

Sandra Cinto,
We are star dust, 2008.
Permanent pen and acrylic on MDF,
275 x 370 cms.
Collection: Fundación Pedro Barrie de La Maza.
Photo: Cláudio Coelho.

3AM: Wonder, Paranoia and the Restless Night — Chapter Gallery, Cardiff

Danny Treacy,
Them #17, 2007.
Lambda digital C print
mounted on aluminium,
215 x 180 cms.
Courtesy the artist.

3AM: Wonder, Paranoia and the Restless Night — Chapter Gallery, Cardiff

Tonico Lemos Auad,
Sleep Walkers, 2009.
Brazilian and Belgian lace and electric parts,
17 individual hand sewn lanterns.
Dimensions variable.
Unique in a series of three variations.
© the artist.
Courtesy the artist and
MUHKA (Museum van Hedendaagse Kunst Antwerpen).

The post Night Moves appeared first on We Heart; Lifestyle & Design Magazine.

08:29

Super Stylin’

Andrew Esiebo,
Urban Aesthetics,
Cotonou No.6 (2012)

One of the beauties of this job is that you never stop learning, and I know a heck of a lot more about West African barber’s shops than I did when commencing to write about Andrew Esiebo’s photographic study of the subject. Nigerian-born Esiebo has been on a tour of eight West African cities – Lagos (Nigeria), Cotonou (Benin), Accra (Ghana), Abidjan (Ivory Coast), Monrovia (Liberia), Bamako (Mali), Dakar (Senegal) and Nouakchott (Mauritania) – investigating this often-overlooked but culturally important aspect of society, and his collected findings are now on display under the title Pride at Tiwani Contemporary, West London.

The exhibition is organised into four sections. Urban Aesthetics takes an exterior view, looking at how the colourful, hand-painted shop fronts interact with the street life outside. In Nuances, Esiebo notes the global similarities and recognisable symbols of the barber, while The Barbers focuses on the men at work. Rounding out the collection is Style, positing a powerful link between the hairstyles of black men to their social identity. The cut-off date for Pride is 8 February.

@Tiwaniart

Andrew Esiebo — Pride

Andrew Esiebo,
Nuances,
Accra No.7 (2012)

Andrew Esiebo — Pride

Andrew Esiebo,
Nuances,
Bamako No.2 (2012)

Andrew Esiebo — Pride

Andrew Esiebo,
The Barbers,
Bamako No.2 (2012)

Andrew Esiebo — Pride

Andrew Esiebo,
Urban Aesthetics,
Accra No.5 (2012)

Andrew Esiebo — Pride

Andrew Esiebo,
Nuances,
Accra No.12 (2012)

Andrew Esiebo — Pride

Andrew Esiebo,
Nuances,
Abidjan No.33 (2012)
Andrew Esiebo: Pride
is on at Tiwani Contemporary
until 8th February 2014,
www.tiwani.co.uk

The post Super Stylin’ appeared first on We Heart; Lifestyle & Design Magazine.

January 13 2014

10:52

On The Waterfront

Alvin Baltrop,
The Piers (exterior view of Day’s End) 1975-86
Silver Gelatin Print
4 x 6 inches

The docks of any city are generally shady places, and when that city is 1970s New York City, and the docks have been abandoned to an underclass of homeless, deviants and criminals… the mind boggles.

The shipping industry for which New York City’s docks were built moved its base of operations to New Jersey in the ’60s; the oil crises of the late 1960s and ’70s were big factors in the dismantling of the docks. This migration created a vacuum, leaving a whole lot of industrial space on the outskirts of the city vacant – but not for long. Out of sight, out of mind to some extent, the docks became a hub for all sorts of other activities. Gay cruisers, smugglers, prostitutes and drug dealers found its empty buildings ideal for their purposes, and they became a home of sorts for many sleeping rough.

It probably goes without saying that, where society’s outcasts and their unseen sub-cultures went, artists were quick to follow. Among the most important were photographers Alvin Baltrop and Gordon Matta-Clark. Vastly different in approach, the pair found themselves in the same time and place, and their contrasting but ultimately complimentary work is the subject of a retrospective, The Piers From Here, at Open Eye Gallery in Liverpool – a city with strong historical links with New York and not without its own share of docklands issues.

Baltrop threw himself into the communities that developed around the docks, befriending the characters and documenting with an unflinching eye the harsh and sometimes unpalatable realities of life there. Corpses and sunbathers, masochists and petty criminals – he documented it all, but central to his work was the docks themselves.

Matta-Clark was also deeply interested in the architectural aftermath of the “de-industrialization” of the docklands. He saw art as a way to regeneration, and to this end, in 1975 he illegally took possession of Pier 52 with the aim of creating an arts centre there. A sculptor as well as a photographer, his most famous work Day’s End involved cutting a large section away from the side of the pier, letting in a stream of light reflected from the harbour water which changed character with the shifting angle of the sun during the day. The effect can be seen in several images by both Matta-Clark and Baltrop, who documented the beginnings of what would become “anarchitecture” during the course of his photographic investigations.

The absorbing exhibition at Open Eye Gallery on Liverpool’s waterfront ends on 9 February.

@OpenEyeGallery

Alvin Baltrop And Gordon Matta-Clark — The Piers From Here

Alvin Baltrop,
The Piers (exterior with person sunbathing) 1980, printed 2011
Digital C print
6.25 x 9.25 inches
Edition 1/15

Alvin Baltrop And Gordon Matta-Clark — The Piers From Here

Alvin Baltrop,
Pier 52 (Gordon Matta-Clark’s “Day’s End” building cuts with two men)
1975-86
Silver Gelatin Print
6.25 x 9.25
The Bronx Museum, NY

Alvin Baltrop And Gordon Matta-Clark — The Piers From Here

© Gordon Matta–Clark,
the Estate of Gordon Matta-Clark

Alvin Baltrop And Gordon Matta-Clark — The Piers From Here

Alvin Baltrop,
Super Cream 1980,
Printed 2011 Digital C Print
6.25 x 9.25 inches

Alvin Baltrop And Gordon Matta-Clark — The Piers From Here

Alvin Baltrop,
Pier 52 (Exterior View of Gordon Matta-Clark’s “Day’s End”)
1975-86
Silver Gelatin Print
4 x 6.25 inches

Alvin Baltrop And Gordon Matta-Clark — The Piers From Here

Alvin Baltrop,
Friend (The Piers) 1977
Sliver Gelatin Print
5 x 4.25 inches

Alvin Baltrop And Gordon Matta-Clark — The Piers From Here

© Gordon Matta–Clark,
the Estate of Gordon Matta-Clark

Alvin Baltrop And Gordon Matta-Clark — The Piers From Here

Alvin Baltrop,
Homeless Guy 5 1975-86
Silver Gelatin Print
11 x 7.5 inches

Alvin Baltrop And Gordon Matta-Clark — The Piers From Here

Alvin Baltrop,
The Piers (open window) 1975-86
Silver Gelatin Print
7.25 x 5 inches
Courtesy of The Alvin Baltrop Trust
and Third Streaming, New York

Alvin Baltrop And Gordon Matta-Clark — The Piers From Here

Alvin Baltrop,
Pier 52 (Gordon Matta-Clark’s “Day’s End” building cuts)
1975-86
Silver Gelatin Print
5.25 x 8 inches
BAL12.021/Days End 2
The Byrd Hoffman Water Mill Foundation, NY

Alvin Baltrop And Gordon Matta-Clark — The Piers From Here

Alvin Baltrop,
The Piers
1975-86 (male drinking with cigarette)
Silver Gelatin Print
4.5 x 7.75 inches

Alvin Baltrop And Gordon Matta-Clark — The Piers From Here

Alvin Baltrop,
The Piers (collapsed warehouse) 1975-86
Silver Gelatin Print
8 x 6 inches
Courtesy of The Alvin Baltrop Trust
and Third Streaming, New York

The post On The Waterfront appeared first on We Heart; Lifestyle & Design Magazine.

January 10 2014

11:57

Northern Soul

A street photographer from Manchester, based in Manchester, and photographing Manchester. It is fair to say that Claire Atkinson is a creative ingrained in the city that ingrains her. A city built on textile, music, football, rain… Manchester is a city where romance and poetry can be wrung out from even its darkest corners – something Atkinson achieves in captured moments, fragments of time, tales of inner-city living. “Soulful, friendly, misunderstood”, three words the photographer uses to sum up the city, and it’s one of those in particular that captures the essence of her images. Soulful. Soul in the living, breathing city that continues around her lens, through windows veiled in condensation, from bus windows and on rainy streets.

Outside of The North, Atkinson’s images continue in the same vein, taking northern contemplation to Istanbul and Greek islands. The streets, the people, the romance of dark corners feels very familiar. We’re not that different, after all. Taking brief shelter from the streets, we caught up with Claire for a chat about all things Manchester, photography, and the unavoidable cultures her famous city has been built upon…

@ClaireAtkinson8

Claire Atkinson
Claire Atkinson
Claire Atkinson
Claire Atkinson

The city has changed dramatically since the mid-1990s, but I feel its people haven’t, and your images seem to capture that essence – how would you define the people of ‘your’ Manchester?

Hardworking, passionate and a bit daft.

Urban transit seems to play a key role in your work, the fleeting glances from busses or trams that breed curiosity – I’m often drawn to that romantic notion of lives passing by, stories untold. I guess your photographs leave more questions begging than they answer, do you think that’s the key to great street photography?

In my eyes, it is. I’d rather look at Harry Callahan than Henri Cartier-Bresson. But some of my most popular images are what I would consider to be the most boring. Like the ‘Arse’ sign from Istanbul with the guy’s bum in front of it. People prefer that kind of thing, the ‘funny’ stuff, so I wouldn’t say I’m speaking for the majority there. But that’s quite normal.

Manchester has played a key role in various cultural movements over the years – Sex Pistols at the Free Trade Hall, acid house at the Haçienda… – if you could live in one moment of time, what would that be?

The Smiths are one of my favourite bands but they released their final album the year before I was born. So I’d go back to see their first gigs in Manchester. I’d also sneak back to 1999 and celebrate Manchester United winning the treble again.

Claire Atkinson
Claire Atkinson
Claire Atkinson

Could you share a little bit of information about your kit with us?

I use an old Leica Rangefinder camera, 40mm lens and 35mm colour negative.

If you had the opportunity to collaborate with one creative, who would that be and why?

I’ll choose PJ Harvey because her Let England Shake album is amazing. She took England and turned it into song. Maybe our visions could coincide over this green and pleasant land. Even though my photos are more grey and unpleasant..

Your guilty pleasure…

Bonnie Tyler.

Where could we expect to find you when you’re taking a break from photography?

Photography takes a break with me. I’m a big fan of Greek Islands.

Any forthcoming projects or exhibitions you’d care to share with us?

Manchester is an ongoing project for me. I’m self publishing a couple of things soon and hopefully someday some miscreant will exhibit my bloody pictures.

Claire Atkinson
Claire Atkinson
Claire Atkinson
Claire Atkinson

Photography © Claire Atkinson

The post Northern Soul appeared first on We Heart; Lifestyle & Design Magazine.

December 19 2013

11:14

Close to Home

Mark Dion
The South Florida Wildlife Rescue Unit:
Mobile Laboratory, 2006
Installation view Pérez Art Museum Miami
Mixed media installation
Dimensions variable
Collection Pérez Art Museum Miami,
museum purchase with funds from
the PAMM Collectors Council
Photo credit: Juan Cabrera

Now that the doors of Pérez Art Museum Miami (PAMM) are open after a $200+ million construction project it’s time for the spectacular facility to get down to business. To kick things off, the museum has gathered together what is collectively titled Americana, a series of themed installations which will begin a two-year cycle in the permanent “overview galleries” that form the spine of the exhibition spaces at PAMM.

Looking at 1930 onwards, curator Tobias Ostrander has added works from PAMM’s own growing collection to those of private collections with a commonality based on North and South American production and cultural influence. Americana will be split into two cycles, with the first beginning this month. The six permanent galleries will each host one themed presentation – Desiring Landscape, Sources of the Self, Formalizing Craft, Progressive Forms, Corporal Violence, and Commodity Cultures – with a second cycle beginning in the summer of 2014. Among the highlights of the inaugural event are works by Cuban artist José Bedia, a look back at Chilean Alfredo Jaar‘s Times Square intervention against North American centricity, and Josephine Meckseper’s more recent Thank a Vet. Americana ends in May 2015.

@pamm

Americana — Pérez Art Museum Miami

Alfredo Jaar
A Logo for America, 1987-95
Five cibachrome photographs
mounted on Plexiglas
Edition 3 of 12
Collection Pérez Art Museum Miami,
gift of Luis Calzadilla

Americana — Pérez Art Museum Miami

Josephine Meckseper
Thank a Vet, 2008
Walker, mannequin legs, socks, toilet mat,
metal clip stand, stainless steel scouring pad,
underwear packaging, toilet brush, mannequin chest,
T-shirt, motor oil container, and acrylic cube
on mirrored pedestal
72-1/16 x 94-5/16 x 47-1/4 inches
Collection of Pérez Art Museum Miami,
gift of Mimi Floback
Image courtesy of Andrea Rosen Gallery, NY

Americana — Pérez Art Museum Miami

AMERICANA: Formalizing Craft
Installation view Pérez Art Museum Miami
Photo credit: Daniel Azoulay photography

Americana — Pérez Art Museum Miami

Alfredo Jaar
A Logo for America, 1987-95
Five cibachrome photographs
mounted on Plexiglas
Edition 3 of 12
Collection Pérez Art Museum Miami,
gift of Luis Calzadilla

Americana — Pérez Art Museum Miami

BLAH

Americana — Pérez Art Museum Miami

AMERICANA: Desiring Landscape
Installation view Pérez Art Museum Miami
Photo credit: Juan Cabrera

Americana — Pérez Art Museum Miami

José Bedia
Mamá quiere menga, menga de su nkombo
(Mama Wants Blood, Blood of His Bull), 1988
Acrylic on canvas
55 x 78-3/4 inches
Collection Pérez Art Museum Miami,
gift of Diane and Robert Moss

Americana — Pérez Art Museum Miami

Oscar Muñoz
Cortinas de baño, 1994
Acrylic on plastic
74 x 28 1/2 inches, each curtain;
5 curtains Installation view Pérez Art Museum Miami
Collection Pérez Art Museum Miami,
gift of George M. Safirstein M. D. and Pola Reydburd
Photo credit: Daniel Azoulay photography

Americana — Pérez Art Museum Miami

Alfredo Jaar
A Logo for America, 1987-95
Five cibachrome photographs
mounted on Plexiglas
Edition 3 of 12
Collection Pérez Art Museum Miami,
gift of Luis Calzadilla

The post Close to Home appeared first on We Heart; Lifestyle & Design Magazine.

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